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NEMO Nevada (Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials)

NEMO Photo Gallery

Permeable or Porous Pavement

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Photo by M. Riedl
We rely on pavement for safe, passable streets, but in some circumstances, the amount of pavement can be decreased.
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Photo by M. Riedl
This is an example of a driveway constructed with pavers rather than solid asphalt or concrete. The pavers allow some water infiltration to occur. Notice also that there is a strip of mulched shrubs between the lawn and the street. This helps prevent runoff from lawn irrigation from washing pollutants off the street.
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Photo by S. Donaldson
This is another example of a driveway constructed using pavers. This driveway also has a grating built in to catch sediment and runoff. The captured runoff is funnelled onto the vegetated areas.
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Photo by S. Donaldson
A close-up of the pavers shows the permeable areas within the paver design. Weed control may be an issue.
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Photo by S. Donaldson
Typical cul-de-sac construction includes a wide expanse of pavement.
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Photo by S. Donaldson
This cul-de-sac was constructed with a permeable vegetated center island. This aids in stormwater infiltration and reduces runoff. It also adds visual appeal to the neighborhood.
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Photo by S. Donaldson
Here's a cul-de-sac that incorporates a center vegetated infiltration basin and permeable pavement. This may not be practical in all cases, but could be incorporated in low-traffic areas. Alternately, the center area could be constructed of gravel or sand if irrigation water is not available.