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NEMO Nevada (Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials)

NEMO Photo Gallery

Bioretention and Swales

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Photo by C. Conway
Bioretention is an engineered process to manage stormwater runoff using soil and plants. The process attempts to reproduce the processes that occur in the natural environment when water inflitrates, or soaks, into the ground. Pollutants are broken down or taken up by plants.
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Photo by J. Stone
These features can be used to treat parking lot runoff, rooftop runoff, and other sources of stormwater runoff.
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Photo by C. Conway
In our dry climate, supplemental irrigation is needed to keep vegetation alive.
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Photo by C. Conway
The soils must be engineered to allow adequate infiltration rates.
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Photo by S. Donaldson
Swales are lowered areas of land that allow stormwater to soak into the ground.
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Photo by C. Conway
Swales may be attractively landscaped.
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Photo by C. Conway
Broad, gentle swales such as this also help to slow and retain flood flows.
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Photo by J. Stone
Our soils are not always sufficiently permeable to allow water infiltration in a reasonable period of time.
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Photo by C. Conway
This detention basin allows water to pond for a prolonged period of time, and may provide habitat for vermin such as mosquitoes.
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Photo by C. Conway
It is not a simple matter of digging a hole and channeling storm water to it. The infiltration feature must be carefully designed and constructed. Otherwise, the feature may not only be unsightly but also a health hazard.
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Photo by C. Conway
Swales, drainage features and infiltration basins can be used in concert. The next series of photos shows various storm water processing features at an apartment complex. Storm drain inlets are located in the parking lot and in a shared grass area. The water is transported to a landscaped infiltration basin.
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Photo by C. Conway
 
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Photo by C. Conway