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County Offices

Southern Nye County Programs

Invasive Species (Weeds)

Weeds are one of the most serious threats to Nevada rangelands and lawns. Hundreds of Weed Warriors, Woad Warriors, and other volunteers have been trained by University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE) personnel in how to spot, control and eradicate noxious weeds.

Issue:

Weeds are one of the most serious threats to Nevada rangelands and lawns. Noxious weeds have already invaded thousands of acres of Nevada’s lands and waterways and threaten water quality, wildlife habitat, recreational activities and the economic stability of ranchers, farmers and other land managers.

What Has Been Done:

Hundreds of Weed Warriors, Woad Warriors, and other volunteers have been trained by University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE) personnel in how to spot, control and eradicate noxious weeds. There are numerous activities every spring in which weed volunteers pull and/or spray hundreds of acres of noxious weeds. These volunteers:

  • Educate their neighbors and other local residents about the threat of noxious weeds by making presentations, staffing booths, writing media articles and giving tours.
  • Identify weeds and map infestations. They develop databases and monitor the infested areas.
  • Control and eradicate weeds by conducting weed pulls and applying herbicides to large infestations.

There are more than 30 Nevada coordinated weed associations and other groups, according to the Nevada Department of Agriculture’s Weed Coordinator. UNCE plays an active role in many of these groups, serving as catalysts, educators and grant consultants. The goal is to achieve long-term sustainability of the weed control efforts.

Various weed control methods are also being tested by Cooperative Extension working with local individuals and groups. For example, weed control by ruminants.

Impacts:

The Tahoe Weed Coordinating Group - consists of landowners and managers, regulatory agencies and residents working together to share information and resources to achieve effective weed control in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Cooperative Extension is key to their efforts. As a result of efforts of this group, we measured a 57% decrease in total weed infestations from 2004 to 2006 in El Dorado and Placer Counties, and a 28% decrease on USFS properties in the basin. We also measured a 41% decrease in sites infested with five priority weeds in Incline Village.

The Truckee Meadows Weed Group- provides a variety of educational programs to elementary schools on weeds. Teachers at 19 elementary schools (29.7% of all Truckee Meadows elementary schools) requested one or more presentations. In a post-class test, 63% of students in grades 3-5 could name 2 or more ways that weed seeds spread, and 69% could correctly identify three or more of the five priority weeds. Their outreach campaign this past year was successful in increasing weed reporting via the hotline and Web site. After the Aug. 7 full-page ad, hits on the website jumped from about 90 per day to about 180 per day, and remained elevated. The website was accessed 7,344 times in 2006. Also in 2006, $30,000 from the Carson- Truckee Water Conservancy was used to treat headwaters drainages along the Truckee River. Washoe County Roads treated 1745.3 acres of various weeds along roads, and City of Reno road and ditch maintenance personnel treated 101.4 acres of weeds. Sparks treated 1,234 acres of parks, medians, roadsides, ditches, alleys, schools, etc. with chemical controls in 2006. NDOT spent 290 man-hours controlling weeds with herbicides on approximately 160 acres in wetland mitigation basins and along Interstates 80 and 395. USFS treated 100 acres. Weeds on 2702 total acres were controlled. Finally, volunteers met at several locations to mechanically remove a variety of weed species from local parks and trails. For example: Oxbow Park: April 29 (5 bags of thistles removed by a few volunteers), Mayberry Park: May 6 (27 bags of thistles removed by 10 volunteers); Dorostkar Park: May 6 (90 bags of thistles, hoary cress, perennial pepperweed removed by 2 community service crews led by a Extension trained Weed Warrior).

Weed Control By Ruminants-As a result of this program, 4,000 goats and 2,000 sheep were purchased by five individuals and are now grazing weeds on a contract basis in Eastern Nevada. These five new successful businesses are in their first year of operation thanks in large part to information learned from this program and Extension’s assistance. Over fifty interested parties participated in a two-day educational workshop. Participation ranged from interested grazers, agency personnel and the publisher of Western Farmer Stockman Magazine. Participants were from five western states. On a scale of 1 to 5 with one being poor and five being excellent the 50 participants rated the overall educational program at 4.8. A 4.9 was given to the instructors’ ability to teach and their knowledge of the subject. Comments from several participants included that they will put the information to work immediately. Gallagher Fencing representative stated that fence sales at local stores rose by over $30,000 following this program and the electric fence demonstration. The Western Farmer Stockman editor in attendance used information learned in his feature story which went out to thousands of readers. Two participants hired two of the five new businesses to control weeds on their Elko County properties.

Programs Program Information

4-H Youth Development

4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills.

Desert Green, Commercial Water Conservation Training

Desert Green is in its eleventh year and is designed to educate commercial clientele in the Green Industry as well as others who have an interest in water conservation issues. A committee representing the industry implements the training. Desert Green is chaired by one industry representative and one UNCE representative. The program is presented once a year, with 36 classes taught in a two-day period. A committee of industry representative reviews evaluations from the previous year to decide future educational direction and topics. During the evaluation process, the program is reviewed, modified and revised according to the needs of the clientele. As part of the marketing of this program, two articles citing the importance of Desert Green appear in regional trade publications.

Master Gardeners in Nevada

Master Gardeners provide free, research-based horticulture information to Nevadans. They are volunteers who learn advanced plant science skills from at least 50 hours of classroom instruction by University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE) professionals. After training, Master Gardeners volunteer a minimum of at least 50 hours a year to pass along their newly acquired knowledge through the media, talks and workshops. They answer phone calls, send out informational materials and develop community gardens.

Statewide Programs *Statewide programs may not be available in all counties

Programs Program Information
Beef Quality Assurance
Cattlemen’s Update
Food Safety Project
Grow Your Own, Nevada
Herds and Harvest
Invasive Species (Weeds)
Nevada Radon Education Program
Nevada State GEAR UP
Nevada Youth Range Camp
People of the Land
Pesticide Safety Education Program
Riparian and Watershed Assessment and Management
Risk Management
Stronger Economies Together
Unmanned Aerial Systems
Weed Prevention and Management