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County Offices

Churchill County Programs

Social Media Training

Extension Educator Lindsay Chichester explaining Facebook Page Best Practices to a room of people Carson City/Storey County Extension Educator Lindsay Chichester teaches “Social media: Facebook Profiles, Pages and Groups” to Extension professionals. Photo by Ashley Andrews.


Extension teaches social media for businesses, community members, scientists/agriculturalists and Extension professionals

Relevance/Issue

Nevada businesses, community members, Extension professionals and international scientists/agriculturalists expressed a need for social media training:

  • Many businesses need social media for survival and growth, but using social media does not always come naturally.
  • Many community members, including youth and seniors, want to use social media to connect with friends and family, but are not comfortable with the platforms and do not know how be safe and responsible online.
  • Extension professionals want to learn how to use social media effectively: to improve their educational efforts aimed at sharing research-based knowledge and programs with targeted audiences, and to reach youth, who often rely on social media for information and communication.
  • Scientists/agriculturalists can use social media for collaboration with and inspiration from each other, and to stay informed about public concerns. As such, they should stay current on social media and social networking best practices.

Response/What’s Been Done

Extension provided Social Media 101, Facebook, Instagram & Pinterest, and Videos & Editing courses in 2016 at the request of the Carson City Chamber of Commerce. Carson City Library representatives who attended the trainings wanted to offer similar classes to the community, so Extension added and taught classes for Twitter, YouTube, Social Media for Parents and Social Media for Seniors from fall 2016 through spring 2017. Also in 2016, Extension presented on social media/networking best practices for scientists/agriculturalist at the Third Annual Canadian Wheat Symposium. In 2017, Extension gave 14 presentations: six as a continuation of the 2016 community series, four for scientists/agriculturists at the American National CattleWomen Region 6 meeting in Elko, Nevada, and four for Extension professionals. All trainings ranged from 30 minutes to four hours, and 680 people were trained, including 270 in 2017.

Results/Impact and Partners

Community sessions were informal, with attendees asking questions and the instructor covering topics of interest to those in attendance during that particular session, so no data was collected. However, community feedback was positive, and Extension and the Carson City Library plan to continue offering classes on a regular basis. In addition, the Carson Water Subconservancy District asked for training for their team members and partners.

In 2017 trainings for Extension professionals, Extension taught each of two classes twice — once in northern Nevada and once in southern Nevada — for a total of four trainings. Attendees rated each of the two classes on a scale of one to five. For the “Social Media: What I’ve learned” class in August, 55 responded, including responses from both north and south. The training was rated:

  • 4.43 for how informative it was
  • 4.27 for usefulness

For the “Social media: Facebook Profiles, Pages and Groups” training in December, 48 responded, including responses from both north and south. The training was rated:

  • 4.32 for how informative it was
  • 4.19 for usefulness

Partners included the Carson City Chamber of Commerce, Carson City Library, American National CattleWomen and CropLife International.

IMPACTS




680

people trained since 2016



“I now know what I need to about each social media platform and how it can benefit my business.”

— Business training attendee


Contact: Lindsay Chichester, 775-887-2252

Programs Program Information

Churchill County Community Readiness Network

Nevada communities need rapid access to information during an emergency. In an effort to enhance community preparedness, safety and available resources and by using GPS and GIS mapping, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s 4-H youth and adult leaders in Churchill County are working with community emergency managers to address evacuation and shelter mapping.

Federally Recognized Tribal Extension Program

The purpose of Nevada’s Federally Recognized Tribal Extension Program (FRTEP) is to improve the ability of Native American farmers and ranchers to manage their agricultural enterprises effectively, efficiently and profitably.

Heart & Shield: Rural Domestic Violence Prevention Program

Young girls making collages with magazine pictures

Integrated Pest Management

Nevada Department of Agriculture’s records show the use of traditional pesticides continues to increase in the state. Nevada’s Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program helps agricultural producers, land managers; pest control operators, homeowners and other pest managers learn about and use alternative pest management strategies in a variety of environments and settings.

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and IR-4 program

This program is to test potential pesticides necessary for producing forages in Nevada and submit requests for federal testing and registration from the IR-4 program, which is a federal cooperative program established in 1963 to help the producers of minor crops obtain clearances for pest control materials on those crops. The purpose of IR-4 is to work with farmers, agriculture scientists and Cooperative Extension personnel to carry out research and petition the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in order to obtain tolerances for specific pesticide uses needed by minor-crop producers.

Noxious Weed Control and Awareness Education

Noxious and invasive weeds are widespread throughout Nevada. They threaten agricultural and rangeland productivity. Rural counties are susceptible to significant adverse economic damage. University of Nevada Cooperative Extension education programs help individuals and weed control organization reduce the abundance of noxious weeds.

Risk Management

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE) develops and delivers a comprehensive risk management education program to livestock and forage producers in Nevada.

Sustainable Agricultural Practices

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension conducts several sustainable agriculture programs including researching alternative crops, introducing sustainable biodiversity/multiple use of rangelands, and increasing the number of pest control materials labeled in and increasing the knowledge and implementation rate of IPM practices in Nevada.

Tef Crop Production

The purpose of this program is to introduce Nevada farmers to and help train them in the cultivation of tef, a small-seeded grain and forage crop that requires less water than alfalfa and can be more profitable. There is a strong market for tef seed, which is made into flour to make an Ethiopian flat bread known as injera, as well as for tef hay as a high-quality horse hay.

Statewide Programs *Statewide programs may not be available in all counties

Programs Program Information
4-H Youth Development
Cattlemen’s Update
Food Safety Project
Grow Your Own, Nevada
Herds and Harvest
Integrated Riparian Management/Creeks and Communities
Invasive Species (Weeds)
Nevada Radon Education Program
Nevada State GEAR UP
Nevada Youth Range Camp
People of the Land
Pesticide Safety Education Program
Stronger Economies Together
Weed Prevention and Management
Youth for the Quality Care of Animals