Flag of NevadaIt was originally called “Admission Day” and celebrated by the Pacific Coast Pioneer Society back in the 1870s, and October 31 became a state-recognized holiday in 1933.

However, the date was tweaked in 2000 to the final Friday of October in the hopes that a three-day weekend would gain greater participation. It also avoids the coinciding of the holiday with Halloween, though occasionally it still does fall on October 31.

Nevada Day is the biggest statehood celebration in the whole United States, and the main attraction is the Carson Parade in downtown Carson City, the state capital.

 

Enter to win bannerNevada students are invited to showcase their artistic talents and promote radon awareness by entering the 2018 Nevada Radon Poster Contest, offered by University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Radon Education Program.

The contest ends Oct. 31.

The contest is open to all children ages 9 to 14 years old enrolled in public, private, territorial, tribal, Department of Defense and home schools.

Children can also enter through a sponsoring group, such as art, computer, library, reading, science, scouting, youth or 4-H clubs.

Details can be found on the website.

Clip art of man in hammockAll Cooperative Extension offices will be closed on Monday, September 4 for Labor Day. Regular hours, 8am to 5pm, will resume on September 5. Thank you.

NASA LogoTotal Solar Eclipse

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe-inspiring sights – a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun’s tenuous atmosphere – the corona – can be seen, will stretch from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun’s disk.

Who Can See It?

Lots of people! Everyone in the contiguous United States, in fact, everyone in North America plus parts of South America, Africa, and Europe will see at least a partial solar eclipse, while the thin path of totality will pass through portions of 14 states.

Read more!