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Have a safe and healthy 4th of July. All Cooperative Extension offices will be closed on Tuesday, July 4. Offices will reopen Wednesday, July 5.

Squares with different fruits and veggiesEating fruits and vegetables each day is one of the most important choices you can make to help maintain your health.

Studies have shown that eating at least five servings of different fruits and vegetables each day can lower the risk of getting many different types of chronic diseases.

Fresh fruits and vegetables are cholesterol free and extremely low in saturated fat-if they contain any at all! Fruits and vegetables are also good sources of vitamins and minerals–especially vitamins A and C–as well as the minerals potassium, magnesium, and iron.

Finally, eating lots of fruits and vegetables will increase your intake of fiber.

Certain types of fiber can reduce blood cholesterol in some people. Fiber can also help increase regularity and provide a feeling of fullness so that you are less likely to overeat and gain weight.

Find out what’s a serving?

L-R: Ann Edmunds, Master Gardener Coordinator; Glenda Bona; Angela O’Callaghan, Specialist.

L-R: Ann Edmunds, Master Gardener Coordinator; Glenda Bona; Angela O’Callaghan, Specialist.

Clip art of a trophyCooperative Extension Master Gardener’s celebrated their 25th Anniversary of assisting residents of Clark County.

At the awards luncheon, Glenda Bona received the Volunteer of the Year award. The award is presented to the Master Gardener volunteer who contributed the most hands-on hours on a project. In 2016, Bona volunteered 884 hours on the Herb Garden.

Ralph Sgamma received the Silver Phone Award for volunteering the most number of hours answering phone call questions at the Help Desk.

Congratulations!

Sun-hotYou can grow anything, anywhere, at any time. You can, if you have unlimited resources which so few of us do.
In southern Nevada, we have virtually unlimited sunshine, but little else.

Very little water, excessive heat, and strong winds, we do have.

That does not mean one is stuck with no garden, even in the Mojave.

Success with plants in the desert depends mainly on preparation and time, and less on spending large amounts of money. Read more!