It seems like “winter fire” is a current buzz word… well, buzz words. The news is full of stories of fires that have left destruction in their wake in California, and in other places as well. It seems strange that winter should be a time when such devastating fires would catch.

In all of my childhood memories, fires were typically a part of a Nevada summer. Smoke turning the sun into a burning red disc would coincide with hot sidewalks and dripping ice cream. It was only a couple of years ago that I had my first notable experience with wildfire in winter: when the Washoe Drive Fire tore through Washoe Valley in the middle of January.

It was before my husband and I had bought our house, so the event hadn’t really triggered any “what if” moments for us. We simply worried about the welfare of our friends who lived in communities threatened by the blaze and were relieved when the fire was out.

Last Friday I saw a series of PSAs from Washoe County and Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District on the history of the Washoe Drive Fire and the importance of using an ash can to properly dispose of woodstove and fireplace ashes.

According to the longer of the PSAs, ashes were improperly disposed of and four days later, high winds fanned the resulting blaze. The images from the video are sobering. Flames engulf homes as firefighters brave the fire and try to protect whatever they can. The statistics are staggering: one person died, 29 homes burned, over 10,000 people had to evacuate, and the fire left over four million dollars in damages.

Another video talks about how to properly dispose of fireplace ashes. It’s actually pretty simple: scoop ashes into the ash can, pour water over them, close the lid tightly, set away from combustible materials for at least four days, and once the ashes have cooled, dispose of them in the trash.

Being careful to properly dispose of fireplace and woodstove ashes seems a crucial piece in preventing the devastation of winter fires. To see the Public Service announcements, check out the Living With Fire website at www.livingwithfire.info.

Stay Warm and Safe,

Natalie Newcomer