Recently, I had a defensible space inspection performed on my property by Nevada Division of Forestry’s fire protection officer, Chanse Hunwardsen. Chanse noted some problem areas that I have previously addressed in former blogs, and he also addressed some issues that I had not considered. Watch this video to learn what issues were found and how to resolve them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tuvMbjlRIY&feature=youtu.be

To learn more about our interactive defensible space graphic, check it out here.

Jamie HeadshotJamie Roice-Gomes is the outreach coordinator with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Living with Fire Program.  She earned her Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation and a Master of Arts in Interactive Environmental Journalism. She was a public relations assistant for Conrad Communications, a public information officer intern at the Nevada Department of Conservation & Natural Resources, and a Biological Science Technician at the USDA-Agriculture Research Service. She also enjoys volleyball, the Great Basin Desert, and spending time with her husband and their mini Australian Shephard. Contact Jamie at 775-336-0261 or roicej@unce.unr.edu.

Hey Living With Fire friends, welcome back to our blog! I’m still working on my defensible space and evacuation plan from previous weeks (you can check those posts out here and here).

Today we have something new for you: our very first video blog! In it, we share what happened on my walk a few days ago at Anderson Park in Reno, NV. I was so excited to enjoy one of my favorite walking trails, but discovered that the trail was closed off. Fortunately, our fellow Living With Fire friend, Vince Thomas, was on site and I discussed with him what was going on. You see, he was hired by Washoe Parks and Open Spaces on a grant provided by the Nevada Land Trust, to fix the situation at hand. The trail was closed off due to being overgrown with weeds and brush, which is not only bad for walkers, but is also a wildfire hazard! Luckily, Vince, the owner of Goat Grazers, was put in charge to clear the trail.

In our video blog we discuss what Goat Grazers is, and how they will help the overgrown trail. Let us know in the comments what you think about our first video blog and if you would like us to continue making them. Click here to see it! And if you want a good laugh, be sure to check out our second video for some funny “behind-the-scenes” footage (click here or the link below).

(Special Note: The information given herein is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by Cooperative Extension is implied.)

About the Author: Jenny Digesti is the Assistant for the Living With Fire Program. You can follow her on twitter here.

 

tree

What type of tree is this?

My husband, Marc, and I purchased a home last month in Reno. We are both first time home owners in a brand new development and I must say it has been a fun, yet educational, journey. As a newbie to the Living With Fire team, I find myself hyper-aware of all the potential fire risks.

Marc laughs at me because I tend to take safety manners VERY seriously and I find myself getting worked up when I learn new things. However, he was operating under the assumption that, although the fire risk is real, there really isn’t anything we can do about it.

Boy is he lucky to have me and my team around because there is PLENTY we can do to prepare. I’m not even going to get into my neighborhood as a whole (yet…), but our specific household has a nice wood fence connected to the house. Right up against the fence is a beautiful evergreen tree that appears to be getting a bit dry. I’m not 100% sure what kind of tree it is (I will need to contact a Master Gardener to help me with that) but it seems like a potential risk to me. Marc also laughed when I told him my plans to contact the landscaper about fire-safe plants. Why not when we have this beautiful plant guide available … for FREE!?

I also haven’t gotten around to investigating whether or not the eave vents on our house have screens on them (to be honest, I didn’t even know what an “eave” was…). But, I learned about them at the West Washoe Valley Wildfire Preparedness meeting I attended last month and I am hoping to prepare my defensible space as soon as possible. Maybe all you readers out there can help hold me accountable…

What else do you think I need to look into? Any advice for the “new girl”?

Comment below!

About the Author: Jenny Digesti is the Assistant for the Living With Fire Program. You can follow her on twitter here.