Washoe LakeI am so excited! While doing my weekly perusal of the Living With Fire website , I discovered there is going to be Wildfire Awareness Half Marathon and 5K Trail Run on May 9th at Washoe Lake State Park as part of Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month. I’m not in half marathon shape, but the 5K is certainly in my wheel house. And trail running is so much more fun than jogging in town. I looked at the course map and it looks like parts of the trail will be along what formerly was the Washoe Lake shoreline… the lake has been disappearing before my eyes this year. Then the course continues into the “brushes”… you know, sagebrush, bitterbrush, rabbitbrush, etc. I am familiar with these brushes because they often fuel our wildfires. I read that one of the reasons they selected Washoe Lake State Park for this event was because the mountains surrounding it are covered with the scars of previous wildfires. A friend told me about the Washoe County GIS website  where you can see the boundaries of past wildfires since 1990. The fire scars are evidence that we live in a fire environment. To the south of the park you’ll see the fire scars from the Waterfall, Lakeview, Franktown and Duck Hill fires. Looking north you’ll see the Washoe Drive fire scar and others. Those fire scars are a good reminder that while I’m preparing myself for this run, I should also be preparing my home to survive the next wildfire.  For starters, I’ll clear up all the dead vegetation that has accumulated around my home over the winter.

Who wants to join me at the races?  The entry fee for the half-marathon or 5K is $35 with the proceeds donated to a great cause, the Wildland Firefighter Foundation. This nonprofit organization helps fallen firefighter’s families and firefighters injured in the line of duty and you can learn more about the organization or donate to them here. Smokey Bear will be there as well fire engines, exhibits and other activities. So even if you’re not running, there will be lots to see and do. Register for the run here, or go to the Living With Fire website for more information. If you live in Southern Nevada, don’t feel left out. There’s a Wildfire Awareness run at Red Rock Canyon National Park on May 30, and you can register for it here also. Maybe I’ll double my fun and run in both!

Cheers!    Natalie

As a member of a community located in the wildland-urban interface where a beautiful hike is moments from my door, there’s always wildlife to study, and the stars seem to burn a little brighter at night, I take pride in my community. I also take comfort in the multiple fire stations close by, for as beautiful and enjoyable as the hills around my house are, they could quite easily burn, and if the old charred sagebrush carcasses I’ve seen on my hikes are any indication, they have before.

I appreciate my community fire service men and women. I think they’re heroic and brave, and cannot begin to count the number of neighbor kids I used to babysit who wanted to be firefighters when they grew up. So with the faith society puts on our fire services, it’s absolutely reasonable for me to expect a fire engine in my driveway, protecting my house from a wildfire, right? Well, maybe not.

A recent internet search turned up a production by The Denver Post called “The Fire Line: Wildfire in Colorado.” The video features compelling stories of the people who lost their homes to Colorado wildfires and the firefighters who were tasked with defending them. The message is well delivered and simple: in a society where more and more homes are built in the wildland, it’s unfair to expect firefighters to put themselves in certain danger to defend them, when the homeowner has not taken any steps to reduce their fire threat. I highly recommend it. Watch it here, and keep a tissue handy!

It appears as though Nevada’s got a similar idea. The Living With Fire homepage features the poster for the Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month campaign. The message: Prepare Your Home For Wildfire. See the poster and a list of events people around the state are participating in, at http://www.livingwithfire.info/wildfire-awareness-month.

Living With Fire’s message behind the poster is also simple: “This year we hope to change the traditional reactionary thinking of protecting our homes from wildfire to a proactive approach – prepare your home for wildfire!”

I think I’ll take this call to action to task. By preparing my home for the wildfire I know is bound to strike the hills by my house again, then I’ll have done my community fire services a favor. It’ll be easier to defend a house that’s ready, or if the area’s not safe for them to be in, I’ll know my house still has a chance of surviving without a fire engine in my driveway. Now that’s something to take comfort in.

To learn how to make your home safer from a wildfire, and a place that fire services can better defend, visit livingwithfire.info.

Cheers!

Natalie Newcomer