Image Source: Wikipedia

Image Source: Wikipedia

Did you know that I grew up in Illinois? Yup… the good ol’ Midwest. We don’t live with the threat of wildfire in that neck of the woods – our “gift” from Mother Nature comes in the form of a mighty whirlwind called a tornado. When I moved to Reno, I thought I had mostly escaped tornadoes … but did you know there is such a thing as a “fire tornado” … otherwise known as a “fire whirl”? This event, although rare, is highly destructive and occurs when a fire is whipped up by strong, hot, dry air currents to form a vertical whirl – literally creating a tornado full of fire!  Their occurrence is not only visually spectacular but alerts firefighters of very unstable air and extreme fire behavior.

Fire whirls can uproot trees and can carry flaming debris great distances! Some of the largest fire whirls can be more than half a mile tall, produce winds over 100 mph and last for more than 20 minutes. Not surprisingly, these flaming tornadoes can ignite new fires by moving into unburned territory. Fire whirls are so threatening, that virtually all state forestry services include fire whirl basics in their training. I don’t know about you, but I am happy that I won’t have to deal with them anytime soon. It definitely helps me to appreciate my firefighters that much more and peaks my awareness level about MY part in being prepared for wildfires. Remember, that while our friend Smokey Bear says … only YOU can prevent wildfires, it is also true that only WE can prepare our homes for wildfire when it occurs. Check out how you can prepare your home for wildfire here!

Do you have any experiences with fire whirls? Please share your stories in the comments below!

About the Author: Jenny Digesti is the Assistant for the Living With Fire Program. You can follow her on twitter here.

Washoe County's CodeRED logo

Washoe County’s CodeRED logo

In July’s post (which you can read here), I talked about the importance of creating a Family Emergency Plan in order to prepare for wildfire. Since I really had no clue what I would do in a real-life evacuation, I decided to do a little research. I inquired about evacuation routes and found out that there isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach for everyone. This is because each incident is different and the routes are difficult to predict. So, it was recommended that I sign up for my specific location’s emergency notification system. For me, this service is Washoe County Code Red. The Code Red Notification system, which is easy and free to sign up for, uses a series of remote computers and telephone lines to relay a recorded message during an emergency. The notifications can be sent to multiple phone lines and email addresses, and will give you specific instructions as to how to respond to an emergency in your area.

It’s also important to pay attention to announcements on the radio or TV and the Emergency Alert System in terms of getting information on a current emergency situation. Social media can be helpful as well. I know that not everyone likes (or understands) social media, but it really is a valuable tool for officials to send information quickly to a large amount of people. I bet your local emergency services department has a social media account! Washoe County’s Facebook page can be found here.

So, I signed up for Code Red and feel a bit more at ease in terms of what to do in an emergency with this information. Why not take some time right now to learn about your area’s emergency notification systems? A good place to start is by calling your county’s emergency management department, local fire department or Sheriff’s department. If you live in Washoe County and would like to sign up for CODE Red, visit their site here. And check out our Wildfire Evacuation Checklist here for more tips on how to prepare for a wildfire evacuation!

Share with us what you learned about your area’s emergency notification systems in the comments. Together, we can all be informed!

About the Author: Jenny Digesti is the Assistant for the Living With Fire Program. You can follow her on twitter here.

Hey Living With Fire friends, welcome back to our blog! I’m still working on my defensible space and evacuation plan from previous weeks (you can check those posts out here and here).

Today we have something new for you: our very first video blog! In it, we share what happened on my walk a few days ago at Anderson Park in Reno, NV. I was so excited to enjoy one of my favorite walking trails, but discovered that the trail was closed off. Fortunately, our fellow Living With Fire friend, Vince Thomas, was on site and I discussed with him what was going on. You see, he was hired by Washoe Parks and Open Spaces on a grant provided by the Nevada Land Trust, to fix the situation at hand. The trail was closed off due to being overgrown with weeds and brush, which is not only bad for walkers, but is also a wildfire hazard! Luckily, Vince, the owner of Goat Grazers, was put in charge to clear the trail.

In our video blog we discuss what Goat Grazers is, and how they will help the overgrown trail. Let us know in the comments what you think about our first video blog and if you would like us to continue making them. Click here to see it! And if you want a good laugh, be sure to check out our second video for some funny “behind-the-scenes” footage (click here or the link below).

(Special Note: The information given herein is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by Cooperative Extension is implied.)

About the Author: Jenny Digesti is the Assistant for the Living With Fire Program. You can follow her on twitter here.

 

To-go bag essentials

To-go bag essentials

I was talking with my friend, Jed Horan, from the North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District and he suggested I write a blog on the importance of having an evacuation plan, knowing a route out of my neighborhood and what to do if that evacuation route was blocked.

What a great idea, I thought…

However, once I sat down to write this article, I realized a couple of things:

  1. My husband and I are not prepared for a real life evacuation at all, and
  2. Preparing for an evacuation is not a simple “one-size-fits-all” topic.

In order to set a good example, I want to start prepping now before it is too late. My first stop was to the Living With Fire website where I discovered some general wildfire evacuation preparation guidelines that can help beginners, like me, get started. Writing this blog really got me thinking about important subjects that I had not thought of before such as:

  • Creating a Family Emergency Plan
    • Who would my husband and I contact? And how?
    • Where would we meet?
    • What would we take?
    • Where is our escape route and safe place?
    • Do we know how to turn off the water, gas and electricity?
  • Essentials for a “to-go” bag (click here for tips)
  • Disaster Supply Kits (tips on making this kit here)
  • Preparing for Pets
    • What if our dog, Bella, was at doggy daycare? Do they have an emergency response plan?
    • Don’t forget about pet food!

I don’t know about you, but I am glad my Living With Fire teammates brought this to my attention. Wildfires are inevitable – so preparing for them in advance can help ease your stress a bit. I’ve got a lot of planning ahead of me, but feel free to follow me and join in on my journey as I tackle each one of these steps. I’ll keep you updated on my progress here and you can help hold me accountable! Meanwhile, I’m still working on my defensible space from last month … click here to see that post.

What about you? Are you prepared for a wildfire evacuation?  Do you have any tips to help me prepare?

Comment below!

About the Author: Jenny Digesti is the Assistant for the Living With Fire Program. You can follow her on twitter here.

tree

What type of tree is this?

My husband, Marc, and I purchased a home last month in Reno. We are both first time home owners in a brand new development and I must say it has been a fun, yet educational, journey. As a newbie to the Living With Fire team, I find myself hyper-aware of all the potential fire risks.

Marc laughs at me because I tend to take safety manners VERY seriously and I find myself getting worked up when I learn new things. However, he was operating under the assumption that, although the fire risk is real, there really isn’t anything we can do about it.

Boy is he lucky to have me and my team around because there is PLENTY we can do to prepare. I’m not even going to get into my neighborhood as a whole (yet…), but our specific household has a nice wood fence connected to the house. Right up against the fence is a beautiful evergreen tree that appears to be getting a bit dry. I’m not 100% sure what kind of tree it is (I will need to contact a Master Gardener to help me with that) but it seems like a potential risk to me. Marc also laughed when I told him my plans to contact the landscaper about fire-safe plants. Why not when we have this beautiful plant guide available … for FREE!?

I also haven’t gotten around to investigating whether or not the eave vents on our house have screens on them (to be honest, I didn’t even know what an “eave” was…). But, I learned about them at the West Washoe Valley Wildfire Preparedness meeting I attended last month and I am hoping to prepare my defensible space as soon as possible. Maybe all you readers out there can help hold me accountable…

What else do you think I need to look into? Any advice for the “new girl”?

Comment below!

About the Author: Jenny Digesti is the Assistant for the Living With Fire Program. You can follow her on twitter here.

DS Inspection Pic.smTalking with my friend and neighbor over coffee this morning, the subject came up that in spite of high winds and drought this past summer, we escaped with no real occurrence of wildfire to threaten our homes.  Oh sure, there was smoke in the air and daily reports, not to mention pictures,  of the extreme flames and wicked burning of the King Fire in California but no real danger close to home this year.  “Just a run of good luck” my neighbor said shaking her head.  “I know” I responded, “but one of these days our luck is going to run out and that smoke and those flames are going to be knocking on our doors.”   Unfortunately, my friend has the same feeling as many others in the neighborhood: there is nothing we can do about wildfire. If it is going to burn, we will just deal with it when it happens.  I quickly set her straight, telling her there is a lot we can do before we smell smoke and the embers start flying. But it’s going to take the whole neighborhood, everyone in the community to get in gear.  “That will take some real effort,” she said as she headed for the door, “If you see a way I can help let me know.”

I thought about what she said and she was right of course, it will take some effort.  But nothing worth doing is free from effort and right now, as winter approaches, is the perfect time to get this started.  I know that as a community we are vulnerable to the devastation that accompanies wildfire.  I don’t want anybody’s home to burn down, especially mine, and I don’t want to see anyone get hurt.   I also know we are going to need help.  I am no expert when it comes to fire and firefighting and I don’t know anyone who is.  But, I bet right now, with the fire danger down, is a good time, maybe the best time, to call on my local fire department to give us a hand.  I am certain they will have professionals that can give us advice on just how vulnerable we are and what we need to do to reduce the risk we face.  And, there are no doubt experts from the Federal agencies that oversee the land around us that would also be willing to help out.  But for that to happen, I know we must show that as a community of people we are ready to do our part.  Wildfire is not like earthquakes and tornadoes. Unlike those disasters, there is a great deal we can do prior to the fire starting to affect the way the fire burns and increase our chance of survival.  So, first I need to get a planning group of interested neighbors together and outline the steps we need to take to get this community energized and organized, perhaps joining the new Nevada Network of Fire Adapted Communities. I just learned about that at a conference held in October, and you can learn more here.

I’ll bet an invitation for dessert and coffee would bring some neighbors together and get us started.  And, I am sure the folks at Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program would give us a hand.  I need just a little more coffee and then… to the phone.

Cheers!

Natalie